30th September - 4th October 2019

Palma de Mallorca

As northern Europe starts to feel the onset of autumn, a late September regatta in the Mediterranean is an easy sell.

Famous for its perfect conditions, spectacular scenery and legendary local hospitality, the Oyster Palma Regatta has always been popular. And with 30 entries representing 16 different nationalities, this year is clearly no different. 

Indeed, the continued popularity of the event has meant that the number of classes has grown from three to four evenly matched fleets.

Class 1 is the home of the big boats from Trevor and Judy Hill’s Oyster 725 Intrepid, to Richard Hadida’s 885 Lush. Within this fleet are two teams that stood on the podium last year, overall class winner Pitanga and Starry Night that finished second. But while they may come to the event with form, there is little doubt that they will be pushed hard by the likes of iSNL and Satori. 

Class 2 sees a gathering of sixty footers and while Klavs Bruun Kristensen’s recently launched 675 Amphora is the largest, the fleet is tightly packed and also promises some pressure from behind with some close racing among the three 655s and four 625s that make up the rest of the fleet.

When it comes to Class 3 the grouping is even closer with six of the seven entries being 575s, all keen to pit themselves against the new kid on the block, Panthalassa, the first of the brand new Oyster 565.

Oyster NM 190930 10988 v2

Aside from representing the fifty footers in the fleet, from the Oyster 49 Yattarna to the 56 Olanta, Class 4 also reflects the international nature of an event with five different nationalities. 

The event comprises four days of racing, two days around laid marks in Palma Bay and two passage races out and back to Andratx with each race being between 18-23 miles.

Weather conditions for the opening day look set to provide a gentle start to the event with an 8-10 knot south westerly breeze.

But while a run down the entry list and a look at the forecast may give an indication of what is in store, there is nothing quite like an afternoon dock walk to reveal the broad nature of the event.

From crews packing spinnakers on foredecks, to divers scrubbing waterlines, there was plenty of serious race preparation. But with cocktails and canapés on deck the social side of the week had already started too.

Getting the mix right is one of the special ingredients – it’s what makes this Oyster Regatta a not to miss event.

Registration Day

Day 1

Palma 2019 Race Day 1 Image 1 v2

By the time crews had scrubbed up and headed for the evening’s chic reception at the Palau March after the first day’s racing, most were admitting that they were itching for a shade more breeze for the opening day of the Oyster Regatta in Palma. At the very least, a solid sea breeze is where these long legged, blue water cruisers excel as they eat up the miles in comfort and at speed. But a solid breeze in the teens was not what was on offer, at least not today.

Clearly, when it comes to the weather as the saying goes, it is what it is and when the day’s forecast includes wind speeds in single figures it’s easy to skip past the detail. Sub 10 knot breezes often mean shifty conditions making it difficult for crews to plan with any confidence.  Yet those that took note of the detail in the forecast at the skipper’s daily morning briefing had seen a trend for a steady right hand shift in the breeze. And those that put theory into practice afloat were rewarded with an early advantage when conditions on the racecourse in Palma Bay performed to the brief.

The amply proportioned sausage/triangle configuration course that kicked off with a five-mile beat helped in this regard too, providing a large race area across which the weather could play out to the script. 

Palma 2019 Race Day 1 Image 2 v5

First off for the opening day’s racing was Class 2 comprising eight sixty footers. Leading the charge in this fleet was the recently launched 675 ‘Amphora’ that surged off the front of the pack on the first beat. 

Hot on their heels in Class 1 having stared 10 minutes behind, were  the two 885s, ‘Lush’ and ‘Guardian Angel’ that duly worked the right hand side of the course as the forecast had suggested, to set the pace among the big guns as they started to haul in the bulk of Class 2. 

Keeping momentum in the light breeze was the key for all, fortunately the sea state was flat helping everyone to maintain their delicate pace upwind. 

First around the top mark was ‘Guardian Angel’ whose team had not only kept their pace throughout, but had tacked bang on the lay line, cutting the corner on those who had been forced to over stand the mark when the breeze swung even further right. But even for ‘Guardian Angel’, the upwind leg had been a long grind that required patience. From the start, to the top of the course had taken just over an hour and a quarter. 

Next around was ‘Amphora’ in Class 2 delivering an opening performance that had shown just how slippery the latest generation of Oyster really is. More evidence was to come on the downwind leg as she sailed faster and deeper than the rest of her fleet.

Third around was ‘Lush’ who, pulled off the first of two gybe sets in a bid to outperform the two front runners by hooking into to the slightly stronger breeze on this side of the course. Behind them was the 82 ‘Starry Night’, a boat that has competed in every Oyster Palma regatta to date.

Palma 2019 Race Day 1 Image 6 v5

As the downwind leg played out it became even clearer by the minute that this race would require a stealth like approach to every manoeuvre. And as the breeze started to increase by a couple of knots, so the fleet began to light up and a pecking order based on size start to appear.

On the water, ‘Guardian Angel’, the more potent and powerful of the two 885’s stretched her lead in Class 1, as did ‘Amphora’ in Class 2 as the two fleets reached around the triangular sections of the course. 

Come the end of the final downwind leg to the finish, both boats’ leads were sufficient to deliver line honours and overall wins. 

In Class 1, ‘Starry Night’ crossed the line third but took second overall on corrected time, while the 625 ‘Kalia’ took the bridesmaid’s spot in Class 2.

In Class 3 it was clear that with six of the seven boats in the fleet being 575s, there would be a close battle from the off. This was surely as close to a one design fleet as it was possible to get. Yet even so, the big unknown was the new kid on the block, the latest model to be launched in the Oyster range, the brand new 565 Panthalassa. No one knew how she would perform but plenty wanted to know.

Based on her on the water performance at least, this boat is a rocket ship and another example of the potent performance of the new generation of Oysters. But on handicap, life was not so straightforward and she had to settle for fourth overall behind ‘Pacific’ that took the class win and ‘Janus’ who slipped up the pecking order into second after ‘Lisanne’ was forced to drop a place after jumping the gun at the start.

Palma 2019 Race Day 1 Image 4 v3

Meanwhile, in Class 4 the crew of the Oyster 56 ‘Olanta’ continued their race winning ways of last year by scoring a clear victory in today’s opening race, beating second placed ‘Ostra’ by more than six minutes on corrected time.

It had been a tricky day of light winds that required a softly, softly approach and while most would have preferred a few more knots of breeze to spark up performances, there is nothing like finishing, whatever the conditions, to provide a good source of conversation at the social. And there was no shortage of that.

Day 2 sees a change of gear on the racecourse as the fleet heads on a passage race to Andratx.

GALLERY

CLASS 1
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
GUARDIAN ANGEL 885 1
STARRY NIGHT 82 2
LUSH 885 3
INTREPID 725 4
SATORI 745 5
PITANGA 745 6
ISNL 825 7
BARE NECESSITIES 82 8
CLASS 2
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
AMPHORA 675 1
KALIA 625 2
DELICIA 625 3
BLOW 655 4
RUTH II 625 5
METEORITE 655 6
TIGER 625 7
ROCK OYSTER 655 8
CLASS 3
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
PACIFICA 575 1
JANUS 575 2
LISANNE 575 2
PANTHALASSA 565 3
IRENE III 575 4
MASTEGOT 575 5
MISS TIGGY 575 6
CLASS 4
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
OLANTA 56 1
OSTRA 53 2
YATTARNA 49 3
MOY TOAD 53 4
SIONNA 56 5
SABA OF HAMBLE 53 6

Day 2

PHOTO 2019 10 02 20 26 14

When Spiderman, Cat Woman and the Incredible Hulk turned up at the morning briefing it became harder than you think to concentrate. 

The morning dock stroll that followed didn’t help clear up matters either when we stumbled across a vicar presiding over a shot gun wedding on the aft deck of ‘Sionna’ while offering a confessional service to those in need shortly afterwards.

This was just the start to a very weird day. 

Those that had read the notice of race in detail knew that Day 2 was fancy dress day and while there were plenty of surprises in store as teams emerged from below decks in their kit for the day, the racing itself was to prove to be even weirder at times than the crews’ attire.

Here, Day 2 saw a change of gear with a course that took the fleet on passage from Palma, around to the west, to an overnight stop in the pretty port of Andratx. 

On the face of it and when compared to the around the cans race of the day before, this was a simpler looking point-to-point course. But as race officer Ben Mobley set out the conditions for the day it became clear that there were plenty of unknowns and variables to consider.

With a cold front lurking out to the northwest and making its way south along with mistral conditions to the northeast in France, Palma found itself in the middle of two distinct weather systems with a number of widely different outcomes possible depending on which weather feature won out. 

Oyster NM 191002 12312

Little surprise then as teams headed out towards the start area, all eyes we looking out for clues in the sky. 

The morning had started off well with typical Palma sunshine and heat to match. But as dark clouds swept across the island from the north and the rain hammered down over the town, a local breeze swept out towards the start area from the East bringing rain and white caps with it.

Such localised conditions had most teams wondering how long this breeze would last after the rain had passed through. The answer came around 30 minutes later, shortly after Class 4 and 3 had started. 

By this time the first two classes to start had covered the mile long beat to the first mark, rounded it and headed southwest to open water with spinnakers set. 

Behind them, Class 2 were approaching the top mark just as the breeze shut down altogether parking this fleet at a variety of angles around the mark as they struggled to find the breeze. 

As they ghosted downwind the big guns in Class 1, who had started last, were catching up and running in towards the back of Class 2. 

The result was an impromptu multi class gathering as another rain shower then threw a smattering of snakes and ladders over the area.

PHOTO 2019 10 02 20 25 46 2

But as the rain cleared and the fleet slipped around the next mark of the course, Ile del Sec, figuring out how to clear the next headland with kites set appeared to be harder than many had expected. Getting around Cap de Cala Figuera and clearing the rocky headland was the next challenge of the day. 

In such light breezes, aboard big boats that were struggling to keep their pace, no one dared take down their kites for fear of being passed by their competitors. The trip along the rocky coastline was beginning to feel like a game of chicken.

“I’ve never been that close to that corner of the island before and I’m not planning to again,” said the owner of the Oyster 675 ‘Amphora’ Klavs Bruun Kristensen. 

Plenty of others admitted to feeling the same later on.

Yet, even when safely around the corner there was another hurdle to overcome, namely a complete shut down in the breeze. 

As the rigs and sails slapped from side to side there were signs of a new breeze approaching from the northwest. As the rigs on the horizon started to heel to the breeze, the frustration built among those still waiting for the wind to arrive. But with no boat speed and a light current dragging the fleet along the coast, there was little else to do other than to be patient.

Oyster NM 191002 13475

 And when the breeze finally did arrive it was solid. 

Conditions were spectacular with15-20 knots, bright sunshine and a punchy sea state. It was difficult to image that just minutes before the same bows that were plunging through crystal clear waters had been motionless.

Adding to the superb conditions, the beat to the finish in Andratx was set along a spectacular coastline. This was Majorca at its best.

For most the upwind blast provided an opportunity to stretch their legs, but for some the long beat turned into a needle match to the finish. In particular, the two 745s ‘Satori’ and ‘Pitanga’ locked horns in a match race to the finish, crossing the line with little more than a boat length between them. All of which made for some great banter ashore at the dock party in Andratx where vicars, leprechauns, vikings, Cat Woman and many more filled the dockside to round off an extraordinary day.

GALLERY

CLASS 1
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
GUARDIAN ANGEL 885 1
LUSH 885 2
SATORI 715 3
PITANGA 745 4
INTREPID 725 5
ISNL 825 6
STARRY NIGHT 82 7
BARE NECESSITIES 82 8
CLASS 2
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
BLOW 655 1
AMPHORA 675 2
ROCK OYSTER 655 3
METEORITE 655 4
RUTH II 625 5
KALIA 625 6
TIGER 625 7
DELICIA 625 8
CLASS 3
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
MASTEGOT 575 1
LISANNE 575 2
MISS TIGGY 575 3
JANUS 575 4
PANTHALASSA 565 5
IRENE III 575 6
PACIFICA 575 7
CLASS 4
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
SIONNA 56 1
OSTRA 53 2
OLANTA 56 3
YATTARNA 49 4
MOY TOAD 53 5
SABA OF HAMBLE 53 6

Day 3

DSC 4052

Being offered a steak sandwich for breakfast aboard Mike Kearney’s Oyster 56 ‘Sionna’ was certainly very welcome. So too was the invitation to trim the mainsail for the day – there’s nothing like a defined role to focus the mind. But perhaps I should have twigged that there was a potential catch and that the two were linked.

As we headed out to the start, a glance around the aft end of the cockpit to familiarise myself with the control line layout revealed that the mainsheet was a double-ended system with a winch on each side of the cockpit coamings, perfect.

“Ah, I see you’ve found your place already,” said Mike. “That’s grand. You’ll be needing this.” 

With which, he offered me a handle. 

Winch handles are a rare sight in the Oyster fleet, but the reality struck home immediately. Only the primary winches aboard Sionna were powered. 

Fortunately there was a saving grace. Day 3 was another passage race, a return from Andratx to Palma and with the breeze coming out of the north the bulk of the race would be a downwind affair with light sheet loads, at least for the mainsheet trimmer.

Oyster NM 191003 15833

Class 4, in which Sionna is racing, may have the smallest boats in the fleet but the racing is intense. The start alone proved that.

As the first class to start there were no markers or guides as to the best route to take up the first leg. Instead the decision was all ours for the short beat to the north, before turning the windward mark and heading southeast and downwind. But in the final 60 seconds before the start it was clear that the entire fleet had figured out the best place to start and their time on distance to the line. No one was giving any quarter.

Indeed, according to the race management team, throughout the start sequences that followed it was clear that all of the classes had locked into the event and raised their game, getting more competitive with every start.

 

Oyster NM 191003 16036

But, while the starts and the first beats were important, the story of day three was about the long downwind leg back to Palma. With 15-17 knots of breeze from the northwest and a sea state to match, the downhill slide was about tactics and boat speed. 

The tactical side came with planing where to put in gybes to make best use of the shifts and wind acceleration zones around headlands. Avoiding the lulls and wind shadows was key too. On top of this there were also opportunities to surf down the face of a few waves as the sea state kicked up in various places.

The net result was that while the downhill component of the day’s racing accounted for around two hours of sailing, concentration was key and the tactical calls came thick and fast. Aboard Sionna there was barely time for an ice cream.

Oyster NM 191003 16158

Interestingly and as another mark of the steady uplift in performance across the entire fleet during the week, the leaders among the smallest boats were only overtaken by the biggest two boats, the 885s ‘Guardian Angel’ and ‘Lush’, who had started 30 minutes behind, in the closing minutes of the race after three hours of racing. 

While the intention had not been to create a pursuit style race, the result was just that in that the bulk if the fleet finished at around the same time. The downwind style course also threw up some interesting results come the finish. 

While Vasily Senatorov’s ‘Olanta’ took another win in Class 4, the Oyster 575 ‘Irene III’ took the top spot in Class 3 for the first time in the week.

In Class 2 it was Henrik Jansen’s Oyster 655 ‘Blow’ that stood atop the podium, while in Class 1 the Oyster 82 ‘Starry Night’ went from a frustratingly slow race the day before, to taking the overall win in this class today to help mix up a set of results that have so far been dominated by Guardian Angel.

Friday is the final day for the event and after a day in which the pack got shuffled the pressure will be on in several of the classes. 

And with a forecast for a decent breeze and with the prospect of a bit more upwind racing around the cans, there may well be a few more teams offering steak sandwiches for breakfast.

GALLERY

CLASS 1
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
STARRY NIGHT 82 1
SATORI 745 2
GUARDIAN ANGEL 885 3
INTREPID 725 4
LUSH 885 5
PITANGA 745 6
BARE NECESSITIES 82 7
ISNL 825 8
CLASS 2
ENTRY MODEL POTISION
BLOW 655 1
RUTH II 625 2
AMPHORA 675 3
KALIA 625 4
TIGER 625 5
METEORITE 655 6
DELICIA 625 7
ROCK OYSTER 655 8
CLASS 3
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
IRENE III 575 1
PANTHALASSA 565 2
JANUS 575 3
LISANNE 575 4
MISS TIGGY 575 5
PACIFICA 575 6
MASTEGOT 575 7
CLASS 4
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
OLANTA 56 1
SIONNA 56 2
OSTRA 53 3
YATTARNA 49 4
MOY TOAD 53 5
SABA OF HAMBLE 53 6
Oyster NM 191004 17388

Day 4

While some teams were defending a lead they had built throughout the week, for others the final day was crunch time. But the weather was a concern for all.

Dawn had revealed mirror like conditions across Palma Bay and while the forecast suggested that the breeze would increase to 7-8 knots, it looked like it would be a slow process - And it was.

As the fleet motored out to the start area the race committee announced a postponement to racing as the fleet milled around wandering about the prospects for the day.

Teams like ‘Guardian Angel’ in Class 1 had already built a decent points lead throughout the week. No racing would deliver overall success.

It was a similar situation in Class 2 where the Oyster 655 ‘Blow’ had won the last two races to hold the overall lead over the Oyster 675 ‘Amphora’.

Oyster NM 191004 16469

There was similar situation between Vasily Senatorov’s 56 Olanta and Mike Kearney’s 56 Sionna who were also separated by just 1.25 points. 

But, as it turned out the breeze built steadily and allowed racing to get underway with just a 30 minute postponement as the 8 knots that were forecast arrived with a billiard table flat sea state.

As each class headed off on a similar figure of eight styled course there were shifts and breeze lines to keep the tacticians on their toes. 

But by now, with a week of racing under their belts, all the boat handling was slicker and quicker throughout and in many cases the margins had shrunk.

In Class 1, Guardian Angel led the field but Lush was hot on her heels on corrected time. At the finish Lush was just 22 seconds behind on corrected time, but the overall win was secure for Guardian Angel.

In Class 2 Henrik Jansen’s Blow came second on the day but this was enough to secure the overall class win with Klavs Bruun Kristensen’s Amphora in second.

Oyster NM 191004 16815

The needle match in Class 3 was hotly contested.

Going into the final race it was Louis Goor’s Oyster 575 Irene III that held the overall lead, but only by 0.25 of a point with a total of 5.75 points. Behind her, the next three boats that included Janus, Lisanne and the 565 Panthalassa were all on 6.00 points. And even behind them, the gap was only a further 0.75 points for Pacifica and Mastegot.

In the end it was a win in the final race for Eric and Ann Alfredson’s Lisanne that pushed Irene III off the top spot.

Oyster NM 191004 16732

Meanwhile, Class 4 may have had the smallest and most mature boats in the fleet, but the racing was just as close, particularly between the leading pair of 56s, Vasily Senatorov’s Olanta and Mike Kearney’s Sionna.

For the final race, Sionna took an impressive win, hauling back into the frame during the race. This impressive performance put them on equal points with Olanata. But when it came to the tie break, both had two firsts, both had two seconds and the pair were only separated on the difference between their last remaining results, a fifth and a third delivering the final overall victory to Olanata.

It doesn’t get much closer than that.

GALLERY

CLASS 1
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
GUARDIAN ANGEL 885 1
LUSH 885 2
INTREPID 725 3
PITANGA 745 4
STARRY NIGHT 82 5
SATORI 745 6
ISNL 825 7
BARE NECESSITIES 82 8
CLASS 2
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
KALIA 625 1
BLOW 655 2
DELICIA 625 3
AMPHORA 675 4
RUTH II 625 5
METEORITE 655 6
TIGER 625 7
ROCK OYSTER 655 8
CLASS 3
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
LISANNE 575 1
JANUS 575 2
PANTHALASSA 565 3
IRENE III 575 4
MISS TIGGY 575 5
PACIFICA 575 6
MASTEGOT 575 7
CLASS 4
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
SIONNA 56 1
OLANTA 56 2
OSTRA 53 3
YATTARNA 49 4
MOY TOAD 53 5
SABA OF HAMBLE 53 6

OVERALL RESULTS

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With 30 entries representing 16 different nationalities, the 2019 Oyster Regatta in Palma was fully subscribed once again. As in previous editions the four day format consisted of two days racing around marks in Palma Bay at the beginning and end of the event. The middle two days saw an out and return pair of passage races to the pretty port of Andratx on the west coast Majorca during the middle of the week. 

This year’s fleet consisted of another broad mix of boats in the fleet from the two Oyster 885s, Guardian Angel and Lush, through to the smallest boat in the fleet, Yattarna, an Oyster 49. 

The wide range of models meant that this year the fleet was divided into four classes rather than the three of previous years, which made for some very close and engaging racing throughout. The best example of the tight competition was clear to see on the final day in Class 3. 

Of the seven boats in this class, all bar one were Oyster 575s with the outsider being the all-new 565. Only recently launched and marking a new step forward for the company there was plenty attention focussed on this boat and how she might compete against the others in her class.

DSC 4110

Going into the final race it was Louis Goor’s Oyster 575 Irene III that held the overall lead, but only by 0.25 of a point with a total of 5.75 points. Behind her, the next three boats that included Janus, Lisanne and the 565 Panthalassa were all on 6.00 points. And even behind them the gap was only a further 0.75 points for Pacifica and Mastegot.

The results sheet alone made it clear that in this fleet the racing would go all the way down to the wire.

In Class 2 eyes were focussed on the needle match between the 655 Blow and the 675 Amphora. Throughout the week Amphora had proved to be as potent in the light as she was in stronger conditions and yet it was Henrik Jansen’s Blow that had won both of the passage races in this class. 

Meanwhile, Class 4 may have had the smallest and most mature boats in the fleet, but the racing was just as close, particularly between the leading pair of 56s, Olanta and Sionna. The difference in crew experience between these two boats was also of interest. Vasily Senatorov is a Dragon sailor and his team aboard Olanta included several accomplished racing sailors.

Oyster NM 191002 14604

Meanwhile Mike Kearney’s crew of family and friends only race at the Oyster regatta once a year and had no significant previous racing experience. This was only their third event. So, conscious of his team’s lack of racing experience Kearney had included two race hardened crew who had been with him in the previous regattas to help them get up to speed. The formula had clearly worked.

But while the quality of racing is clearly one of the key ingredients to the success of the Oyster Palma Regatta, it is the mix of good racing and relaxed social events that has delivered the continued success of this event.

Throughout the week relaxed and varied social gatherings from dock parties, to dinners and even a movie evening, all were consistently well supported. Further solid evidence as to the strength of support that there is throughout the fleet comes with not just how long crews spend socialising around the boats every evening, but how many spent the entire day racing and partying in fancy dress on the passage race to Andratx. From a team dressed as superheroes, to pirates, leprechauns, Vikings and many more, there are few regattas of this level in the world that can carry fancy dress off in the heart of an international regatta.

Oyster NM 191002 13791

There were also three boats that came to the event with a different set of credentials, a circumnavigation in the 2017/19 Oyster World Rally. Few regattas have such a broad mix of entries and yet manage to maintain such an evenly matched and universally appealing event.

So, while results may be the most visible aspect of the regatta, the ongoing success of the Oyster Palma Regatta comes down to a sophisticated mix.

But when it did come to the silverware, Guardian Angel took the overall win in Class 1 while Henrik Jansen’s Blow took the top trophy in Class 2.

The needle match in Class 3 was hotly contested on the final day’s racing and saw Eric and Ann Alfredson’s Lisanne push Irene III off the top spot.

In Class 4 Sionna took the win on the final race to put them on equal points with Olanata. When it came to the tie break both had two firsts, both had two seconds and the pair were only separated on the difference between their last remaining results, a fifth and a third delivering the final overall victory to Olanata.

CLASS 1
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
GUARDIAN ANGEL 885 1
LUSH 885 2
STARRY NIGHT 82 3
SATORI 745 4
INTREPID 725 5
PITANGA 725 6
ISNL 825 7
BARE NECESSITIES 82 8
CLASS 2
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
BLOW 655 1
AMPHORA 675 2
KALIA 625 3
RUTH II 625 4
DELICIA 625 5
METEORITE 655 6
ROCK OYSTER 655 7
TIGER 625 8
CLASS 3
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
LISANNE 575 1
JANUS 575 2
PANTHALASSA 565 3
IRENE III 575 4
PACIFICA 575 5
MISS TIGGY 575 6
MASTEGOT 575 7
CLASS 4
ENTRY MODEL POSITION
OLANTA 56 1
SIONNA 56 2
OSTRA 53 3
YATTARNA 49 4
MOY TOAD 53 5
SABA OF HAMBLE 53 6